Brain & body

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TJrandom
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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Fri Oct 10, 2014 4:59 am

Tom-Palven wrote:I thought the first three very short paragraphs in this article were interesting, if not the rest:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... ality.html


I attended a funeral – a two day affair, starting with the preparation for a wake, and including 12 or so separate ceremonies, so I had lots of free time and was surrounded by hundreds of people. I tried the `entwine your fingers` test on maybe 30 people, roughly 50/50 by sex, and only found one `L on top` person, a male if it matters. Not a single person had a ring finger as long as their index finger.

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Tom Palven » Fri Oct 10, 2014 8:16 am

Fwiw, I just measured, and drawing a parallel line across the tops of my fingers, my ring finger appears to be about 3/8" longer than my index finger. When inserting a ruler down between my fingers this distance shortens to the ring finder being about 1/8th inch longer, apparently because the index finger is set a little further back on the palm.

When my wife and I compare hands, her ring and index fingers appear to be of equal length, while my ring finger definitely looks longer, again, for what that's worth, which I guess is about zero.

(And remember that the measurement of one's penis conventionally begins at the anus.)
If one can be taught to believe absurdities, one can commit atrocities. --Voltaire

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Re: Brain & body

Postby kennyc » Fri Oct 10, 2014 10:07 am

scrmbldggs wrote:
kennyc wrote:
scrmbldggs wrote:A cucumber is a fruit. If it matters. :-P

It is? :?: :shock: :o

I think so, seeds inside = fruit.

Many people believe the tomato is a veggie, too, but it was declared a vegetable in the US for taxation purposes, IIRC. I think the rest of the world still considers it technically a fruit.


That's rotten!

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Last edited by kennyc on Fri Oct 10, 2014 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Fri Oct 10, 2014 11:28 am

Tom-Palven wrote: ... (And remember that the measurement of one's penis conventionally begins at the anus.)


Um, Who`s anus? :D

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Gord » Fri Oct 10, 2014 3:30 pm

TJrandom wrote:
Tom-Palven wrote: ... (And remember that the measurement of one's penis conventionally begins at the anus.)

Um, Who`s anus? :D

Did you mean "whose"?

If not, I could nominate a few people for the title!
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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Fri Oct 10, 2014 6:53 pm

Gord wrote:
TJrandom wrote:
Tom-Palven wrote: ... (And remember that the measurement of one's penis conventionally begins at the anus.)

Um, Who`s anus? :D

Did you mean "whose"?

If not, I could nominate a few people for the title!


Works both ways...

BTW, I just googled `index finger` and learned that it is the same as Pointer, or Trigger finger. So, a correction to my post above.... Everyone looked at, male and female, had ring fingers longer than their index fingers.

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The Brain GPS...

Postby TJrandom » Thu Dec 18, 2014 10:38 pm

I knew it – as I have always been able to find my way home, know which way to go, never get lost, rarely need to use a map, etc. Now where am I….

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-s ... eople.html


Scientists locate homing signal in brain, explaining why some people are better navigators

The part of the brain that tells us the direction to travel when we navigate has been identified by UCL scientists, and the strength of its signal predicts how well people can navigate.

It has long been known that some people are better at navigating than others, but until now it has been unclear why. The latest study, funded by the Wellcome Trust and published in Current Biology, shows that the strength and reliability of 'homing signals' in the human brain vary among people and can predict navigational ability.

In order to successfully navigate to a destination, you need to know which direction you are currently facing and which direction to travel in. For example, 'I am facing north and want to head east'. It is already known that mammals have brain cells that signal the direction that they are currently facing, a discovery that formed part of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to UCL Professor John O'Keefe.

The latest research reveals that the part of the brain that signals which direction you are facing, called the entorhinal region, is also used to signal the direction in which you need to travel to reach your destination. This part of the brain tells you not only which direction you are currently facing, but also which direction you should be facing in the future. In other words, the researchers have found where our 'sense of direction' comes from in the brain and worked out a way to measure it using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

"This type of 'homing signal' has been thought to exist for many years, but until now it has remained purely speculation," explains Dr Hugo Spiers (UCL Experimental Psychology), who led the study. "Studies on London cab drivers have shown that the first thing they do when they work out a route is calculate which direction they need to head in. We now know that the entorhinal cortex is responsible for such calculations and the quality of signals from this region seem to determine how good someone's navigational skills will be."

In the study, 16 healthy volunteers were asked to navigate a simple square environment simulated on a computer. Each wall had a picture of a different landscape, and each corner contained a different object. Participants were placed in a corner of the environment, facing a certain direction and asked how to navigate to an object in another corner.

"In this simple test, we were looking to see which areas of the brain were active when participants were considering different directions," says Dr Spiers. "We were surprised to see that the strength and consistency of brain signals from the entorhinal region noticeably influenced people's performance in such a basic task. We now need to investigate the effect in more complex navigational tasks, but I would expect the differences in entorhinal activity to have a larger impact on more complex tasks.

Dr Martin Chadwick (UCL Experimental Psychology), lead author of the study, said: "Our results provide evidence to support the idea that your internal 'compass' readjusts as you move through the environment. For example, if you turn left then your entorhinal region should process this to shift your facing direction and goal direction accordingly. If you get lost after taking too many turns, this may be because your brain could not keep up and failed to adjust your facing and goal directions."

The entorhinal region is one of the first parts of the brain affected by Alzheimer's disease, so the findings may also help to explain why people start to get lost in the early stages of the disease. The researchers hope to develop their simple simulation task so that it might be used to aid early diagnosis and monitor the progression of the disease.

Dr John Isaac, Head of Neuroscience and Mental Health at the Wellcome Trust said: "Neuroscientists have made huge advances in our understanding of how we navigate space, widely recognised after this year's Nobel Prizes, and this research is yet another step forward. Why some people are better navigators than others is intrinsically interesting, but it also helps us explain the processes that go wrong in people with degenerative brain disorders such as dementia. An estimated 850,000 people are living with dementia in the UK, many of whom suffer deterioration in their navigational skills, leaving them lost and confused."

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Re: The Brain GPS...

Postby OlegTheBatty » Thu Dec 18, 2014 11:37 pm

TJrandom wrote:I knew it – as I have always been able to find my way home, know which way to go, never get lost, rarely need to use a map, etc. Now where am I….

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-s ... eople.html


Scientists locate homing signal in brain, explaining why some people are better navigators

The part of the brain that tells us the direction to travel when we navigate has been identified by UCL scientists, and the strength of its signal predicts how well people can navigate.

Many years ago, I went to Australia for 8 months. While there, my sense of direction was flipped. My perceived north was actually south. That did not change while I was there; and when I returned home, everything was back to normal. Interestingly, it was back to normal when the plane landed in Fiji for an hour. On the way to Oz, I stopped in Fiji for a week, and my direction sense was normal then, too.

I didn't know for the first month that it was flipped. Since all locations were unknown, there was no independant reference point. If I asked for directions, no one said 'south', they said 'that way'.

I found out when I went to leave Sydney (I bought an old car). I dug out a map to look up the best route out of town, and everything I'd visited in Sydney was in the wrong direction.

And yet, the sun rose in the east and set in the west, just like at home. Whatever signals the brain processes to determine direction, mine was definitely discombobulated.
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Re: Brain & body

Postby scrmbldggs » Fri Dec 19, 2014 4:26 am

You can read a map?! You must be Canadian.

Meanwhile elsewhere, one is given directions based on the names of stores and restaurants. :cry2:

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Flash » Fri Dec 19, 2014 5:59 am

No we can't read maps either. We look at which side moss grows on a tree.

Now days it's all GEPEEZZZ. The little arrow on a screen and a calm voice telling us; turn right, turn left.
Half the lies they tell about me aren't true. Yogi Berra.

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Re: The Brain GPS...

Postby Gord » Fri Dec 19, 2014 11:13 am

TJrandom wrote:Scientists locate homing signal in brain, explaining why some people are better navigators

I can't even find the right part of my brain. Where is it, exactly? Does anyone have a map?
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Re: Brain & body

Postby scrmbldggs » Fri Dec 19, 2014 5:39 pm

Image

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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:46 pm

Infrequently vile, that is me…. Take this test to see how you rate…..

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2015112 ... ersonality

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Matthew Ellard » Thu Dec 03, 2015 11:28 pm

I was ranked "Moderately Nefarious" which was a bit of a let down.

I blame the questions. One question asked : "Do you like to quickly take revenge on people who have slighted you?"

However, there was no question "Do you like to slowly and meticulously destroy the will to live, in people who have slighted you?". That would have been more accurate.

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Gord » Fri Dec 04, 2015 6:43 am

Infrequently vile

You are infrequently vile – you mostly put others before yourself, though you may find occasions in which your dark side shines.
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Re: Brain & body

Postby Angel » Fri Dec 11, 2015 1:05 pm

In order to test a person the tester
must apear to be an equal to the testee
as a poor testee will say brocoli to
impress the tester. I imagine most
people would say potato or tomato
as these r the most eaten by all.
*~ •~*~•~*~•~*~•~*~•~*~•~*~•~*

First they hired me.
No they didn't .
Then they fired me.
Yep.
They by (?) I just walked away......

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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Sat Dec 12, 2015 12:16 pm

Angel wrote:In order to test a person the tester
must apear to be an equal to the testee
as a poor testee will say brocoli to
impress the tester. I imagine most
people would say potato or tomato
as these r the most eaten by all.


Angel - if you are responding to the OP... It isn`t the veggie that is eaten by most, but rather the first one that a child learns - the one that is imprinted in his brain due to being first, a distinctive color, and shape. I have `done` over 30 Japanese, 10 or more Americans, and a few Singaporeans and Malaysians - plus several more unknown nationalities on dive boats. All with exactly the same named veggie - in English, and in Japanese.

Only in this forum - where it is written, and not spoken face to face - were different results obtained.

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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Mon Dec 14, 2015 7:21 pm

How ignorant is YOUR country? Take the Perils of Perception quiz to reveal how much - or little - you know about issues affecting your nation


I only got 4 out of 10 for Japan… and was `graded` as Not-Bad. Who knew?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... ation.html

EDIT.. for the US I got 6 out of the 10 correct....

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Gord » Tue Dec 15, 2015 6:11 am

I got 4/10 for Canada, the US, and Japan. :?

Wow, Japan doesn't have very many immigrants! (That's one I actually got right!)
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
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Re: Brain & body

Postby TJrandom » Tue Dec 15, 2015 7:49 am

Gord wrote:I got 4/10 for Canada, the US, and Japan. :?

Wow, Japan doesn't have very many immigrants! (That's one I actually got right!)


Nope - wetbacks here are rare indeed. I wonder why...

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Re: Brain & body

Postby Angel » Tue Dec 15, 2015 4:57 pm

Taken from the view of
the brain & body communication ~
I do not live life vicariously through
You~ I breath life into you that you
may live life more abundantly .
I live there for you are.
*~ •~*~•~*~•~*~•~*~•~*~•~*~•~*

First they hired me.
No they didn't .
Then they fired me.
Yep.
They by (?) I just walked away......

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Re: Brain & body

Postby SkyePerkins » Thu Aug 18, 2016 3:29 pm

TJrandom wrote:Try this….. Tell a person that you want to give them a simple test…

Ask them (in rapid succession) what is 1+2; 2+1; 2+2; 3+1; 1+3; 4+4. (This clears the mind.) Then quickly ask them to name a vegetable. (People will invariably name the same vegetable.) Repeat this with another person who was out of hearing of the prior persons `test` to confirm that they named the same (or possibly a different vegetable).

I have done this in three cultures and two languages, always obtaining the same vegetable result.


This test isn't for me, I can't understand it :(
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Re: Brain & body

Postby Gord » Fri Aug 19, 2016 5:37 am

SkyePerkins wrote:
TJrandom wrote:Try this….. Tell a person that you want to give them a simple test…

Ask them (in rapid succession) what is 1+2; 2+1; 2+2; 3+1; 1+3; 4+4. (This clears the mind.) Then quickly ask them to name a vegetable. (People will invariably name the same vegetable.) Repeat this with another person who was out of hearing of the prior persons `test` to confirm that they named the same (or possibly a different vegetable).

I have done this in three cultures and two languages, always obtaining the same vegetable result.


This test isn't for me, I can't understand it :(

Then your mind is already clear™.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE


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