Sea Monster

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Wordbird
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Sea Monster

Postby Wordbird » Thu Jul 26, 2018 7:40 am

When I was a child, my grandfather claimed to have seen a sea monster in one of the canals in south Florida, swimming out toward the sea. He claimed that it was exactly the way old timey maps have them drawn, with repeating sets of coils visible above the water as it swam. He said he never saw the head, though, just those repeating sets of coils in motion.

He wasn't lying (deliberately) but I wonder what this could be. He was insistent that the sets of coils were definitely connected - he watched the ones at the back recede, though again, he did not see the head.

His story didn't change at all as many times as he told it.

I don't know of anything that swims like this, but I do find it odd that drawings of sea monsters often include these sets of breaching coils.

Deep sea eel with a swim bladder problem?

That's my best guess at what people might have seen to induce them to draw repeating coils like that. One notices that sometimes, toward the end of life (and even while still alive, if barely) fish tend to float.

One would also think that swimming by undulating one long body in and out of the water in repeating sets of coils would be an inefficient way to swim. And perhaps not a deliberate one.

An oarfish, on its side, in its death throes, struggling to get back down, and unable to stop floating might fit the bill.

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Re: Sea Monster

Postby Poodle » Thu Jul 26, 2018 8:46 am

The only large aquatic animals I can think of which undulate their spines in the vertical plane (apart from common or garden flatfish) are the Loch Ness Monster and the imaginosaurus - the latter made a lot of appearances in the medieval period.

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Re: Sea Monster

Postby Gawdzilla Sama » Thu Jul 26, 2018 10:28 am

Your G-father probably saw a school of dolphins.
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Re: Sea Monster

Postby Poodle » Thu Jul 26, 2018 12:10 pm

... and cetaceans.
I was only thinking (for three hours or so). Honest.

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Re: Sea Monster

Postby Wordbird » Thu Jul 26, 2018 6:03 pm

Poodle wrote:The only large aquatic animals I can think of which undulate their spines in the vertical plane (apart from common or garden flatfish) are the Loch Ness Monster and the imaginosaurus - the latter made a lot of appearances in the medieval period.


I can't think of anything either. I'm thinking in the vein of if it really was just one long body, and if there really is something that makes people draw and describe this:

Image

...without too much of a stretch of the imagination, what might it be?

I almost think there are too many instances of these repeating sets of breaching coils for there not to be anything that has them. Yet the big puzzle is why anything would swim like that. It seems inefficient.

This site (the one I pulled the picture from) as a 16th Century description.

http://williammorristile.com/medieval/c ... r_map.html
Vermis, sea snake. There is on the Coasts of Norway, a Worm of a blew and gray color, that is above 40 Cubits long, yet is hardly so thick as the arm of a child. He goes forward in the Sea like a Line, that he can hardly be perceived how he goes; he hurts no man, unless he be crushed in a mans hand: for by the touch of his most tender Skin, the fingers of one that toucheth him will swell.

Poisonous to the touch? This does not sound like a vertebrate.

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Re: Sea Monster

Postby Poodle » Thu Jul 26, 2018 7:55 pm

Wordbird wrote:[http://williammorristile.com/medieval/carta_marina_sea_monster_map.html
Vermis, sea snake. There is on the Coasts of Norway, a Worm of a blew and gray color, that is above 40 Cubits long, yet is hardly so thick as the arm of a child. He goes forward in the Sea like a Line, that he can hardly be perceived how he goes; he hurts no man, unless he be crushed in a mans hand: for by the touch of his most tender Skin, the fingers of one that toucheth him will swell.

Poisonous to the touch? This does not sound like a vertebrate.


That could be a description of the remains of a Portuguese Man o' War. Lose the gasbag and tangle a few tentacles together and you have a blue-grey thing which could comfortably be 60 feet (that's 40 cubits) long and make your hands sting and swell considerably. They've been found as far north as the Hebrides so could conceivably have drifted to the coast of Norway.

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Re: Sea Monster

Postby Matthew Ellard » Fri Jul 27, 2018 1:05 am

We went through the undulation locomotion mathematics for the fake sea serpent in the SF Sea-serpent thread.

Those two brothers also claimed their sea-serpent weighed 55 metric tons and yet in their video of it moving via undulation, no water moved at all. That's because it was actually a flock of birds skimming the water.
:lol:
viewtopic.php?f=7&t=1098&p=367984&hilit=undulating#p367983

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Re: Sea Monster

Postby landrew » Fri Aug 03, 2018 3:20 am

Ever seen one? I haven't, but there have been a large number of sightings.
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