English multitopic

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Thu Jan 18, 2018 4:38 am

Matthew Ellard wrote:...As I am expecting twins in April I'm not sure whether to enrol back in formal Russian language classes again, which start in February.

Now you're both pregnant?
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Matthew Ellard » Thu Jan 18, 2018 4:57 am

Gord wrote:Now you're both pregnant?
Typical bloody sexist male. There are two children and I'm prepared to do my bit for sexual equality and carry one of the children.

All I need to do is find a good mad scientist
:D

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Thu Jan 18, 2018 5:50 am

"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
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Re: English multitopic

Postby TJrandom » Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:43 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:... Maybe we could use the rarely used tilde to indicate sarcasm. ...


Would we need to be Waltzing? Or singing?

Waltzing Matilde, waltzing matilde....

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Austin Harper » Thu Jan 18, 2018 3:18 pm

Matthew Ellard wrote:
Austin Harper wrote:I have found the use of commas in Russian to be a bit confusing. They put them in places I don't expect to see them. Matthew, do you agree?


An example would be “I bought bread, butter, and cheese.” It is sometimes known as the Oxford Comma. Not so in Russian! If there is an и before the last item in a series, no comma (запятая) is needed. So, our sentence would read “Я купил(а) хлеб, масло и сыр” (or хлеба, масла и сыра if you want to emphasize the “part” aspect of it). Note that coordinate clauses joined by и are still separated by a comma.[/color]

Also any clause that begins with чем, которий, or something similar always is preceded with a comma. While some English speakers do this, it's not my writing style and I often forget to do it when translating into Russian.

At the moment I mostly sit around a table with a couple blokes who are chatting in Russian to simply increase my vocabulary. As I am expecting twins in April I'm not sure whether to enrol back in formal Russian language classes again, which start in February.

Don't worry, you'll have plenty of time to get back into formal classes in 2036.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Thu Jan 18, 2018 5:20 pm

JO 753 wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:Maybe we could use the rarely used tilde to indicate sarcasm.
"~That worked like a charm.~"
I like that idea! ~I'm sure the English uzerz uv the world will pick it up imediately and shower you with praiz~!
:lol:
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Poodle » Thu Jan 18, 2018 6:48 pm

Oh no we won't. The whole point of sarcasm is that it isn't identified as such. You're supposed to be witty and aware and just get it.
Oh! - hang on a minute ... ... ...

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Fri Jan 19, 2018 9:13 pm

TJrandom wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:... Maybe we could use the rarely used tilde to indicate sarcasm. ...
Would we need to be Waltzing? Or singing?

Waltzing Matilde, waltzing matilde....
You mean waltzing ma~? :P
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"Every philosophy is tinged with the coloring of some secret imaginative background, which never emerges explicitly into its train of reasoning."—Alfred North Whitehead

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:26 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:
TJrandom wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:... Maybe we could use the rarely used tilde to indicate sarcasm. ...
Would we need to be Waltzing? Or singing?

Waltzing Matilde, waltzing matilde....

You mean waltzing ma~? :P

I get it but you might need to explain it to the others. :heh:
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Re: English multitopic

Postby TJrandom » Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:34 am

Gord wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:
TJrandom wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:... Maybe we could use the rarely used tilde to indicate sarcasm. ...
Would we need to be Waltzing? Or singing?

Waltzing Matilde, waltzing matilde....

You mean waltzing ma~? :P

I get it but you might need to explain it to the others. :heh:


Indeed... I finally saw it! Way to go Nikki! :clap:

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Re: English multitopic

Postby bobbo_the_Pragmatist » Sat Jan 20, 2018 4:45 am

:yahoo: Yes, excellent word play.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Monster » Fri Feb 09, 2018 8:03 pm

This is really good.

https://www.boredpanda.com/funny-englis ... age-jokes/

This one should be of particular interest to some people here.

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Poodle » Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:02 pm

Crash course in linguistics needed here, I feel.

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:29 am

Monster wrote:https://www.boredpanda.com/funny-english-language-jokes/

Image
Sometimes.

I also like to use "boing" as my reference whenever I'm pronouncing "going" and "doing". They should all rhyme, and be sound effects. Try it some time:

At the BOING! of my friend's shoes on the ground, I turned to him and asked, "Where are you GOING! and what are you DOING!?"

It's awesome!
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:47 pm

"Daughter" and "laughter"...spelled the same, pronounced completely differently.

"Did you guys have a boy or a girl?"
"We had a dafter."

"That was so hilarious, I nearly died from lawter."
"Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge."—Carl Sagan

"Every philosophy is tinged with the coloring of some secret imaginative background, which never emerges explicitly into its train of reasoning."—Alfred North Whitehead

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Re: English multitopic

Postby OlegTheBatty » Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:51 pm

I threw that out once I'd thought it through.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:53 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:I threw that out once I'd thought it through.
That must have been tough.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby OlegTheBatty » Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:55 pm

Nikki Nyx wrote:
OlegTheBatty wrote:I threw that out once I'd thought it through.
That must have been tough.

Tough enough to make me cough.
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Sun Feb 11, 2018 6:29 am

Wen did 'set foot' chanje to 'step foot'? :?
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Sun Feb 11, 2018 3:50 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:
OlegTheBatty wrote:I threw that out once I'd thought it through.
That must have been tough.
Tough enough to make me cough.
I trust you ploughed through it, though, right?
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"Every philosophy is tinged with the coloring of some secret imaginative background, which never emerges explicitly into its train of reasoning."—Alfred North Whitehead

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Re: English multitopic

Postby OlegTheBatty » Sun Feb 11, 2018 8:10 pm

There was a slough, I slew the varmint with a bough.
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:03 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:There was a slough, I slew the varmint with a bough.
A guy in Marlborough did the same thing, and it totally got rid of his hiccoughs.
"Science is a way of thinking much more than it is a body of knowledge."—Carl Sagan

"Every philosophy is tinged with the coloring of some secret imaginative background, which never emerges explicitly into its train of reasoning."—Alfred North Whitehead

"Knowledge belongs to humanity, and is the torch which illuminates the world."—Louis Pasteur

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:14 pm

JO 753 wrote:Wen did 'set foot' chanje to 'step foot'? :?

whut :?
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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:19 am

Example:

Father to teenaje daughter around 1980: "If that skumbag Gord ever sets foot in this house agen I'll cut hiz #@$%^$g d&%$ off!"

Same dad to same daughter within the last 5 yirz: "If that skumbag Gord steps foot in this trailer agen he better be bringin nachoz & dip!"
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:41 am

"Set foot" vs. "step foot"? They mean the same thing. I've heard them both since I was a little girl.

Here, check it out: https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014 ... -foot.html

...The Oxford English Dictionary has examples of foot-setting going back to the 1400s and of foot-stepping dating from the 1500s....
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Re: English multitopic

Postby TJrandom » Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:59 am

Sets foot... Steps foot :oops:

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Poodle » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:39 am

Gord wrote:"Set foot" vs. "step foot"? They mean the same thing. I've heard them both since I was a little girl.

Here, check it out: https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014 ... -foot.html

...The Oxford English Dictionary has examples of foot-setting going back to the 1400s and of foot-stepping dating from the 1500s....

The two early examples given for 'step ... foot' are just that - occurrences of step and foot in that order but separated by other words. I don't see how they can be used as historical forebears, or even the hysterical four bears,

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Matthew Ellard » Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:25 pm

Poodle wrote: The two early examples given for 'step ... foot' are just that - occurrences of step and foot in that order but separated by other words. I don't see how they can be used as historical forebears, or even the hysterical four bears,


I only remember "set foot". I thought it, sort of meant, settle a foot inside because that's means you have committed to the act. I'm probably wrong. :D

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Re: English multitopic

Postby OlegTheBatty » Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:59 pm

The earliest is from John Palsgrave’s 1540 translation of The Comedye of Acolastus, by Gulielmus Gnapheus: “Steppe not one foote forth of this place.”

Compare:

I stepped out for a few minutes.
I set foot out for a few minutes.

This example is a different usage from 'set foot in".

The first Oxford example of the phrase with the preposition “in” is from a poem, written sometime before 1547, by the Earl of Surrey: “Stepp in your foote, come take a place, and mourne with me awhyle.”


"Come on in etc." Again, a different usage.

Here’s a 19th-century example, from Richard Burleigh Kimball’s novel Was He Successful? (1864): “When Hiram stepped foot in the metropolis.”


The first clear example.
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:15 pm

Whether you're stepping your foot in or stepping one foot in, you're still stepping foot.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Poodle » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:53 pm

Setting foot appears to be (he says glibly, having looked it up) a hundred years older (15th century v 14th century) than stepping foot. Given the contemporary Standard English Error of the time (I just made that up) I'd say that setting foot takes priority. Otherwise it's just wrong. OK - you take a step, but you do not step your foot - you set it down.
"Leave my house and never step foot in it again" would have elicited a response of "Eh?" in any century in which modern English was spake.

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:29 am

Oh it would not. :beee:
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Wed Feb 14, 2018 3:27 am

Gord wrote:Whether you're stepping your foot in or stepping one foot in, you're still stepping foot.
If you keep doing either one, pretty soon you'll be doing the Hokey-Pokey...and we know that's what it's all about. :P
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Austin Harper » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:06 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:"Daughter" and "laughter"...spelled the same, pronounced completely differently.

"Did you guys have a boy or a girl?"
"We had a dafter."

You're joking but dafter has been an acceptable pronunciation in some areas in the past. I was actually just listening to a podcast where this was discussed.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Wed Feb 14, 2018 6:33 am

HaHAHahHA! And another 10 yirz or so wen the 'au' sound haz disappeared from everywhere exept New York, it'll be DoTR and peepl will make punz about DoTR (female offspring) and DoTR (tool for making dots)!

The comedy nevr endz.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Nikki Nyx » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:35 pm

Austin Harper wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:"Daughter" and "laughter"...spelled the same, pronounced completely differently.

"Did you guys have a boy or a girl?"
"We had a dafter."

You're joking but dafter has been an acceptable pronunciation in some areas in the past. I was actually just listening to a podcast where this was discussed.
Lexicon Valley: Words, For Her
Really? I've never heard anyone pronounce the word that way. How odd. Even weirder, slaughter, which we spell and pronounce like daughter, has a different etymological path.

Daughter:
Old English dohtor, from Proto-Germanic dokhter, earlier dhukter (source also of Old Saxon dohtar, Old Norse dottir, Old Frisian and Dutch dochter, German Tochter, Gothic dauhtar), from PIE dhugheter (source also of Sanskrit duhitar-, Avestan dugeda-, Armenian dustr, Old Church Slavonic dušti, Lithuanian duktė, Greek thygater). The common Indo-European word, lost in Celtic and Latin (Latin filia "daughter" is fem. of filius "son"). The modern spelling evolved 16c. in southern England.
Well, there's the problem: English spelling. :lol: All those -augh and -ough words. "Dawter" would be a better spelling. Strange that we use daughter, but derive other such relationship words from the Latin, like affiliation.

Laughter:
late 14c., from Old English hleahtor "laughter; jubilation; derision," from Proto-Germanic hlahtraz (source also of Old Norse hlatr, Danish latter, Old High German lahtar, German Gelächter)
Still not understanding where the "f" sound came from. "Lafter" would be a better spelling.

Slaughter:
c. 1300, "killing of a cattle or sheep for food, killing of a person," from a Scandinavian slahtr, akin to Old Norse slatr "a butchering, butcher meat," slatra "to slaughter," slattr "a mowing" from Proto-Germanic slukhtis, related to Old Norse sla "to strike"
"Slawter" would be a better spelling, although that looks like it should mean "to make coleslaw." :mrgreen:
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Re: English multitopic

Postby TJrandom » Wed Feb 14, 2018 8:22 pm

Psst... don`t tell JO. ;)


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