Sea-level rise projections made hazy by Antarctic instability

Heated discussions on a hot topic.
User avatar
Gawdzilla Sama
Real Skeptic
Posts: 20463
Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2008 2:11 am
Custom Title: Deadly but evil.

Sea-level rise projections made hazy by Antarctic instability

Postby Gawdzilla Sama » Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:34 pm

Sea-level rise projections made hazy by Antarctic instability
Scientists should have a much better understanding in a few decades how high the sea level could rise

Date: December 13, 2017

Source: Rutgers University

Summary: It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new analysis. The study is the first to link global and local sea-level rise projections with simulations of two major mechanisms by which climate change can affect the vast Antarctic ice sheet.

It may take until the 2060s to know how much the sea level will rise by the end of this century, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick-led analysis. The study is the first to link global and local sea-level rise projections with simulations of two major mechanisms by which climate change can affect the vast Antarctic ice sheet.

The Earth faces a broad range of possible outcomes with climate change. At the less severe end, 2 feet of global-average sea-level rise by 2100 would submerge land that's currently home to about 100 million people. Toward the high end, 6 feet of rise would swamp the current homes of more than 150 million. Either scenario would have drastic impacts in New Jersey and other coastal states.

But the study, published today in Earth's Future, finds that scientists won't be able to determine, based on measurements of large-scale phenomena like global sea level and Antarctic mass changes, which scenario the planet faces until the 2060s. So coastal communities should have flexible contingency plans for a broad range of outcomes by 2100 and beyond, the study concludes.

"There's a lot of ambiguity in post-2050 projections of sea-level rise and we may have to live with that for a while," said Robert E. Kopp, the study's lead author and a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Rutgers. "We could end up with 8 feet of sea level-rise in 2100, but we're not likely to have clear evidence for that by 2050."



Continues...
Chachacha wrote:"Oh, thweet mythtery of wife, at waft I've found you!"

WWII Resources. Primary sources.
The Myths of Pearl Harbor. Demythologizing the attack.
Hyperwar. Hypertext history of the Second World War.
The greatest place to work in the entire United States.

Return to “Climate Change”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest