What book are you reading?

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby numan » Sun Feb 27, 2011 5:29 pm

'
fromthehills wrote:So did I. You didn't get it? Or just didn't think it was funny? I know it was 8th grade humor...tough crowd.

There, there....I thought it was funny!

But then, I find it surprisingly easy to laugh at what Americans say. · · · ;)
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Chachacha » Sun Feb 27, 2011 5:49 pm

Gord wrote:
fromthehills wrote:
Gord wrote:
fromthehills wrote:
Gord wrote:rectilinear
.

Are you sure you didn't pull that straight out of your ass?

Yeah, but I looked it up just to be sure.


So did I. You didn't get it? Or just didn't think it was funny? I know it was 8th grade humor...tough crowd.

No, I got it. I even considered making a similar joke myself. I just...didn't. :P


You mean like, "Yeah, but I looked up it, just to be sure?"

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby fromthehills » Mon Feb 28, 2011 12:49 am

numan wrote:'
fromthehills wrote:So did I. You didn't get it? Or just didn't think it was funny? I know it was 8th grade humor...tough crowd.

There, there....I thought it was funny!

But then, I find it surprisingly easy to laugh at what Americans say. · · · ;)


That's because it takes a great wit to make a hermit laugh. :P

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby fromthehills » Mon Feb 28, 2011 12:52 am

Chachacha wrote:
You mean like, "Yeah, but I looked up it, just to be sure?"


Dude, that's really just juvenile. :lol:

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Mon Feb 28, 2011 2:34 am

Chachacha wrote:
Gord wrote:No, I got it. I even considered making a similar joke myself. I just...didn't. :P


You mean like, "Yeah, but I looked up it, just to be sure?"

Yes. Except I was leaning more towards "look into it." And there would have been a mirror involved, but I couldn't get it to fit in quite right.

(I hope no one ever googles "Jaan Puhvel" and finds this page. :? )
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby xouper » Mon Feb 28, 2011 2:40 am

What book are you reading?


False Alarm: Global Warming -- Facts Versus Fears
by Paul MacRae, 2010
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0986486205/


Next up (when it comes out):

Generation Us: The Challenge of Global Warming
by Andrew Weaver, 2011
http://www.amazon.com/dp/1554698049/

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:07 am

Now I fully admit, I am not reading this book and probably never will, but I have to say this is the greatest book titles I have ever seen: http://media.wiley.com/product_data/cov ... 037172.jpg

The book store people had to ask me to leave the store. :rotfl: :blackeye:
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Mon Mar 14, 2011 12:27 am

The Horse, the Wheel, and Language -- How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, by David W. Anthony, 2007.

446 pages, not including appendix, notes, references, and index -- those bring it to 553 pages.

From the dust jacket:

David W. Anthony is professor of anthropology at Hartwick College. He has conducted extensive archaeological fieldwork in the Ukraine, Russia, and Kazakhstan.


Basically, Professor Anthony seeks to combine the work of linguists with the work of archaeologists, something he says is usually avoided simply because of the gulf between the two disciplines. Building on the work of past specialists, theorists, and discoveries in their fields, combined with information uncovered by Eastern experts in the regions of the former Soviet Union (who worked with their own systems of dating and categorizings, often ignored by the West due to their incompatibility with Western conventions), he pieces together what he sees as the probable history of cultures, migrations, and the movement and development of language that has resulted in the modern world.

Excerpt from Chapter 1, p.5:

...This book argues that it is now possible to solve the central puzzle surrounding Proto-Indo-European, namely, who spoke it, where was it spoken, and when. Generations of archaeologists and linguists have argued bitterly about the "homeland" question. Many doubt the wisdom of even pursuing it. In the past, nationalists and dictators have insisted that the homeland was in their country and belonged to their own superior "race." But today Indo-European linguists are improving their methods and making new discoveries. They have reconstructed the basic forms and meanings of thousands of words from the Proto-Indo-European vocabulary -- itself an astonishing feat. Those words can be analyzed to describe the thoughts, values, concerns, family relations, and religious beliefs of the people who spoke them. But first we have to figure out where and when they lived. If we can combine the Proto-Indo-European vocabulary with a specific set of archaeological remains, it might be possible to move beyond the usual limitations of archaeological knowledge and achieve a much richer knowledge of these particular ancestors.

I find it a fascinating subject, but he becomes hard to read whenever he looks closely at the subjects with which he is most knowledgeable. When he's talking about linguistics, he is easy to follow. When he's talking about archaeology, he becomes overwhelmingly detailed, even though he has dumbed it down for the reader's sake and obviously simplified what would otherwise be gobble-de-gook to a non-specialist like me. This leads to a chapter of simplistic linguistics followed by a chapter of name after name and date after date of archaeological sites, cultures, "complexes," and other specific terms which become a meaningless string of syllables to me; I read them in a sleepy daze (albeit with less of a daze than that which comes upon me whenever I attempt to get through the genealogy readings in the Bible, but only because of the occasional tidbit of interesting facts or concepts I stumble across in Anthony's writing, many of which I quickly jot down so I can come back to them later, or investigate more thoroughly with an internet search).

Fascinating, but a brain-burster of a read at times.

I may end up typying out the last chapter, so I can print it up and read it with friends. It's only eight pages long, but seems to summarize a few things nicely.

Got sum kewl pics in it too. Closest I can find online is here: http://www.archaeologyonline.net/artifa ... gms-2.html Similar images to the top two appear in the book, but drawn in different perspectives and in much clearer and more detailed versions.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Matthew Ellard » Tue Mar 15, 2011 5:42 am

Gord wrote:The Horse, the Wheel, and Language -- How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, by David W. Anthony, 2007.

I find it a fascinating subject, but he becomes hard to read whenever he looks closely at the subjects with which he is most knowledgeable. .


Are we talking about the Royal Hordes? (The Scythians, Transcaucasia in the second and first millenium BC, etc) I have E.D.Phillips' "The Royal Hordes: Nomad People of the Steppes" (1965)
http://www.azerbaijanrugs.com/arfp-img/ ... an_art.jpg

My interest was in Russian history. Here is a reconstructed drawing of Scythians royalty. Before Catherine and Peter "westernised" Moscow most Russian royalty dressed in a similar manner with pointy boots and long golden gowns. The minor princes who killed G. Rasputin were still wearing these clothes when at home in 1916! It is an odd concept that some officers in the Czar's army wore western uniforms at work but pixie suits at night. It would seem that this part of Russian cultural history was wiped out by communism which is a bit sad.


Scythians
http://hal_macgregor.tripod.com/gregor/Scythians.jpg

Russians
http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgurl= ... x=64&ty=73

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Tue Mar 15, 2011 7:25 am

Matthew Ellard wrote:
Gord wrote:The Horse, the Wheel, and Language -- How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, by David W. Anthony, 2007.

I find it a fascinating subject, but he becomes hard to read whenever he looks closely at the subjects with which he is most knowledgeable. .


Are we talking about the Royal Hordes?


No, earlier than them. His discussions ranged from about 5200 BCE to maybe 1200 BCE, perhaps.

He names dig sites, pottery types, cultures known by present-day names (like Yamnaya, Alakul-Federovo, Namazga, and Andronovo, to name a few), and even has a bit to say about tooth wear on horses which he suspects was caused by bits. Some of the more readable paragraphs go like this:

The case for horse management and riding at Botai and Kozhai 1 is based on the presence of bit wear on seven Botai-Tersek horse P2s from two different sites, carcass transport and butchering practises, the discovery of horse-dung-filled stable soils, a 1:1 sex ratio, and changes in economy and settlement pattern consistent with the beginning of riding. The case against riding is based on the low variability in leg thickness and the absence of riding-relted pathologies in a small sample of horse vertebrae, possibly from wild hunted horses, which probably made up 75-90% of the horse bones at Botai. we are reasonably certain that horses were bitted and ridden in northern Kazakhstan beginning about 3700-3500 BCE.


I can read this paragraph. It contains two site names, Botai and Kozhai 1, and one region, Botai-Tersek, with which I can familiarize myself by looking at the map provided. The points he mentions were explained in previous paragraphs -- "carcass transport and butchering" refers to hunted animals whose entire bodies are returned to the settlement, rather than butchered at the kill site for easy transportation, which implies that some better form of transportation was being used than simply men on foot; horse-dung-filled stables indicates the keeping of horses in stalls (rather than letting them free-range), which is important if you're going to use them as transportation; a 1:1 sex ratio means you're killing males and females equally often, even though horses naturally herd in groups of one male and multiple females, or groups of male bachelors, thus implying both sorts of groups are being hunted even though the two generally live far apart in the wild (the only way to capture both herds equally wold be to sweep up all the wild horses over a very large region, which Prof. Anthony suggests would be impossible on foot); etc. and so forth. It's easy reading.

A less readable paragraph might be such:

Most Andronovo metals, like Petrovka metals, were tin-bronzes. Andronovo miners mined tin in the Zeravshan and probably on the upper Irtysh. Andronovo copper mines were active in two principal regions: one was south of Karaganda near Uspenskyi, working malachite and azurite oxide ores; and the other was to the west in the southern Ulutau Hills near Dzhezkazgan, working sulfide ores. (Marked on figure 15.9) One mine of at least seven known in the Dzhezkazgan region was 1,500 m long, 500 m wide, and 15 m deep. Ore was transported from the Uspenskyi mine to copper-smelting settlements such as Atasu 1, where excavation revealed three key-shaped smelting ovens with 4 m-long stone-lined air shafts feeding into two-level circular ovens. The Karaganda-region copper mines are estimated to have produced 30 to 50,000 metric tons of smelted copper during the Bronze Age.34 The labor and facilities at these places suggest enterprises organized for export.


The map, figure 15.9, is from the previous chapter (160 pages earlier!), and doesn't show all the sites mentioned, but does show many many more that aren't, which makes it confusing to read. I can't find "the Zeravshan," the Irtysh, Karaganda, or Uspenskyi on it. I do see Dzhekazgan (with two Zs) though, which I assume must be Dzhezkazgan (three Zs). What's the importance of azurite oxide ores as opposed to sulfide ores? What's the significance of the detail given for the smelting ovens? For a moment, I tried to imagine what I consider a "mine" that could be 1,500 m long, 500 m wide, and 15 m deep -- then I realized it must be a surface mine rather than an underground mind, which is what I always picture when thinking about prehistoric mining. Overall, this is a difficult paragraph for me to read, mainly because I'm left wondering where these sites are in relation to one another and why certain points were made.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Fri Mar 18, 2011 1:26 am

Gord wrote:The Horse, the Wheel, and Language -- How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World, by David W. Anthony, 2007.

Oh, here we go: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/s8488.html

It gives the first chapter for interested people to read. (Personally, I think the last chapter would have been a much better idea, since it actually discusses the book.)
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"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Thu Apr 28, 2011 9:19 pm

Just finished "OPUS: 25 Years of His Sunday Best". Delightful.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Thu Apr 28, 2011 11:04 pm

Phlegmak wrote:Just finished "OPUS: 25 Years of His Sunday Best". Delightful.

Mannn, I expect that would be a good one!

I'm currently reading Reading the Past: Ancient Writing from Cuneiform to the Alphabet by J.T. Hooker: *poit* Really fascinating stuff, I'm learning a few things. Some of the images, though, are troublesome -- mixed up or printed upside down, for instance. But oh well! The writing lets me pick out the errors, so at least I know it's not going over my head. :lol:
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Thu Apr 28, 2011 11:10 pm

Gord wrote:*poit*

:doh:

The link is...argh. I read it as saying "5 ratings" and "2 reviews." But I can't find the reviews! I look and look and look, but nope, cannot find 'em.

But then I figure it out. Guess what? It doesn't say "2 reviews." It says "-2 reviews!" How the hell do you have a negative number of reviews?!?
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"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby OutOfBreath » Fri Apr 29, 2011 6:44 am

Just finished this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Swans-Three- ... 317&sr=1-1

A very good book about the author, her mother and grandmother and their lives in China from early 1900s through Maos cultural revolution until the author went to England in 1978. Very good storytelling, and very educational about China and it's recent history.

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Fri Apr 29, 2011 2:30 pm

OutOfBreath wrote:Just finished this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Swans-Three- ... 317&sr=1-1

A very good book about the author, her mother and grandmother and their lives in China from early 1900s through Maos cultural revolution until the author went to England in 1978. Very good storytelling, and very educational about China and it's recent history.

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I read that one. 'Twas highly good. Nonexistant god bless those women.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby ShadowSot » Fri Apr 29, 2011 2:37 pm

Blank Slate by Steven Pinker and The Panic Virus by Seth Mnoonkin.
"The nation that makes a great distinction between its scholars and its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting done by fools".

– Thucydides

HUMOR

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Tue May 10, 2011 1:20 pm

The journey of man: a genetic odyssey by Spencer Wells, 2002.
Deep ancestry: inside the Genographic Project by Spencer Wells, 2006.
Pandora's seed: the unforeseen cost of civilization by Spencer Wells, 2010.

I wanted to see how his ideas changed over time.

Also, this: The devil's dictionary by Ambrose Bierce, 1978. It's a book of humorous definitions by a journalist between 1869 and 1911, when it was first published. I found it at a book sale, where someone had filed it in the "Occult" section! :lol:
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Matthew Ellard » Thu May 12, 2011 4:06 am

OutOfBreath wrote:Just finished this one:
http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Swans-Three- ... 317&sr=1-1
Dan


Wild Swans is a very interesting book. I had a false concept in my head that the cultural revolution was earlier than it really was. Wild Swans explains that it was still going in the mid 1970s. This was important to me as I had trouble understanding why the PLA (People's Liberation Army of China) was so hopeless in its war against Vietnam in 1977. I bought a handful of English translations of books by retired Vietnamese generals in Hanoi from the government printing office in the 1990s. The Vietnamese generals who ran the Vietnam war were all gearing up for a "big push" in 1975/1976 and were genuinely surprised that victory against the USA came earlier. China thought it was attacking a "war weary" Vietnam when it was actually "ready to go" in 1977.

My parents are a bit strange and they subscribed to the English version cultural revolution magazine "China Recontructs" during the 60's & 70s. They threw these out. I could kill them. These magazines were full of photos of barefoot doctors, dams being built by hand labour, army-uniform chinese operas and so on. I wasn't interested as a kid but I am now.


Photo of front cover of China Reconstructs
http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/exhibition ... om111.html

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby OutOfBreath » Thu May 12, 2011 11:46 am

Yeah, I loved the book for the insight I gained into the cultural revolution, and of chinese history in general.

Goes to show that totalitarianism is never okay no matter what the goal is.

Old Mao propaganda, man that'd be something to leaf through right now. :)

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Sun Jun 05, 2011 2:27 am

Current two books I'm reading are Man-Kzin wars 3, and the current issue of Skeptic.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Sun Jun 05, 2011 2:34 am

Phlegmak wrote:...the current issue of Skeptic.

Lucky jackanapes. :evil: I looked in my local stores again today. Nothin'! Sure, I could get three different magazines dedicated to hunting with a bow, or one called Puppies, but nothing with a skeptical slant at all.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:28 pm

Gord wrote:
Phlegmak wrote:...the current issue of Skeptic.

Lucky jackanapes. :evil: I looked in my local stores again today. Nothin'! Sure, I could get three different magazines dedicated to hunting with a bow, or one called Puppies, but nothing with a skeptical slant at all.

:lol:

I just subscribe to it. You should as well.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:49 pm

I don't know how. :frown:
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:07 pm

Gord wrote:I don't know how. :frown:

:hmm:

http://shop.skeptic.com/merchant.mvc?Sc ... ory_Code=S

I assume they deliver to the Great White North.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Tue Jun 07, 2011 11:49 am

Phlegmak wrote:
Gord wrote:I don't know how. :frown:

:hmm:

http://shop.skeptic.com/merchant.mvc?Sc ... ory_Code=S

I assume they deliver to the Great White North.

Bah! They want two things I don't have: (1) a way to pay online, and (2) a mailing address.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:52 am

Maybe they'll send it to me in sky writing. I wonder how much skywriters charge?
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby OlegTheBatty » Fri Jun 17, 2011 9:12 pm

A-number wrote:Also the book gives up a lot of what goes on behind closed doors of the vatican. In regard to electing A Pope, long time ago, back in the 12 century I think, the cardinals wouldn't agree on one. So the Head of the roman militia and the maire I think locked them up, gave them nothing but bread and water. And when they still wouldn't agree, they went ahead and removed the roof :lol: :lol: :lol: to where they were "debating" . I thought that was AWESOME !!!! needless to say that A Pope was elected shortly after :P .

I think we'd all be better off if they were still in there debating. :mrgreen:
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby OutOfBreath » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:13 pm

Just started on Francis Fukuyama's "Origins of political order".

Looks very promising and interesting. He's setting up a threeway development debate on state, order of law, and accountable government. In the first chapters he's already buried the notion of the individual origins of man and pointing towards the band and tribal nature of chimps and humans.

It's gonna be a 3-volumer as this book only cover until 1750 or so. Very ambitious project, but thought-provoking and summarizing a lot of notions I have been entertaining myself. Just 100 pages in atm. We'll see if my opinion remains favourable throughout. :)

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Sat Jul 09, 2011 11:01 pm

Just finished The Man-Kzin Wars 3. I'll probably move on to God Emperor of Dune.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby fromthehills » Sun Jul 10, 2011 2:18 am

I'm reading the Psychopath Test. So far, so good. First digital book for me , so it seems slower. I'll give a report when I'm done, but it might be a while.

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Brandt » Sun Jul 10, 2011 10:33 pm

Rereading my favorite book, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
[One on top of the other]

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Monster » Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:56 pm

I finished reading The God Emperor of Dune a while back. 'Twas highly good.

I finished reading a book of short stories entitled something similar to More Amazing Planetary Tales. I forgot the real name. 'Twas highly good old science fiction. For the life of me, I can't remember a single story that was in it. I know that Poul Anderson wrote one of the stories, but I can't remember which. It was something about a space faring nation that was similar to Vikings + Scottish warriors, and they were defeated by an Earth spy.

I'm currently reading Three Gothic Stories. I finished "The Castle of Otranto" which was good. I'm currently reading Vathek, which is very weird relative to other stories of its period. Vathek is weirdly chaotic in its storytelling. After that is Frankenstein.

http://books.google.com/books?id=ZjI_DR ... 0140430369

EDIT: I got the name of the book. More Adventures on Other Planets. The story by Poul Anderson is Tiger by the Tail.

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Austin Harper » Tue Oct 18, 2011 9:10 pm

The Dune series is coming up in my ever-growing book queue. I'm currently finishing up Ringworld's Children, the fourth of Larry Niven's four Ringworld books. After that, I'm going to read Bill McCay's Stargate sequels (are a different timeline from the one in the TV series, which also follows the movie).
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Gord » Wed Oct 19, 2011 5:19 am

Beasts and Saints by Helen Waddell.
Popular Tales From the Norse by Asbjornsen & Moe.
The Anatomy of Puck by K.M. Briggs.

The middle one's got quite an interesting appendix, what with its 19th century ideas that would be considered racist today. The book was first published in 1859. The appendix I'm speaking of was originally the Translator's Introduction from the second edition, so I presume it is the writings of the translator himself, George Webbe Dasent. What I'm reading is the Bodley Head edition from 1969; they mention the appendix in their publisher's note:

...We have put the Translator's Introduction as an Appendix believing it to have certain scholarship value and definite interest value, while appreciating that many of the theories advanced in it are now outdated and that their presentation is somewhat haphazard by modern standards....

:mrgreen:

Here is a short example from said Appendix, which I quite enjoyed reading and rereading repeatedly in the middle of the night:

The affinity which exists in a mythological and philological point of view between the Aryan or Indo-European languages on the one hand, and the Sanscrit on the other, is now the first article of a literary creed, and the man who denies it puts himself as much beyond the pale of argument as he who, in a religious discussion, should meet a grave divine of the Church of England with the strict contradictory of her first article, and loudly declare his conviction, that there was no God.

I keep translating this as "Indo-European languages are as sure as God," but I know that can't be right! :lol:
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby OutOfBreath » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:11 am

Just finished with book 5 of the "song of ice and fire" series by George RR Martin. Fantastic stuff. Although it's a bit annoying to end at a cliffhanger that won't be followed through on for 3-4 years. :sigh:

For those who don't know, "the song of ice and fire" is the books behind the HBO series Game of Thrones. (Which also were great btw)

If you have the slightest interest in fantasy or medieval literature, read this series.

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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Major Malfunction » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:17 am

Monster wrote:I finished reading The God Emperor of Dune a while back. 'Twas highly good.

Best of the whole series, IMHO.

I'm currently reading The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. It's set several centuries in the future and explores the effects on humanity of depleted fossil fuels and advanced bio-engineering. Best book I've read in ages.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Major Malfunction » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:28 am

Gord wrote:Here is a short example from said Appendix, which I quite enjoyed reading and rereading repeatedly in the middle of the night:

The affinity which exists in a mythological and philological point of view between the Aryan or Indo-European languages on the one hand, and the Sanscrit on the other, is now the first article of a literary creed, and the man who denies it puts himself as much beyond the pale of argument as he who, in a religious discussion, should meet a grave divine of the Church of England with the strict contradictory of her first article, and loudly declare his conviction, that there was no God.

I keep translating this as "Indo-European languages are as sure as God," but I know that can't be right! :lol:

I think he's saying that English, etc. is a wonderful vehicle for carrying a story. Probably because it's more expressive than Sanscrit.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby OlegTheBatty » Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:13 am

OutOfBreath wrote:Just finished with book 5 of the "song of ice and fire" series by George RR Martin. Fantastic stuff. Although it's a bit annoying to end at a cliffhanger that won't be followed through on for 3-4 years. :sigh:

For those who don't know, "the song of ice and fire" is the books behind the HBO series Game of Thrones. (Which also were great btw)

If you have the slightest interest in fantasy or medieval literature, read this series.

Peace
Dan

Awesome series. I'm waiting for Dances With Dragons to come out in paperback. Reread the whole series just in time for it to be fresh when Game of Thrones started. They did a terrific job too.
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Re: What book are you reading?

Postby Austin Harper » Wed Oct 19, 2011 2:18 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:
OutOfBreath wrote:Just finished with book 5 of the "song of ice and fire" series by George RR Martin. Fantastic stuff. Although it's a bit annoying to end at a cliffhanger that won't be followed through on for 3-4 years.

Awesome series. I'm waiting for Dances With Dragons to come out in paperback. Reread the whole series just in time for it to be fresh when Game of Thrones started. They did a terrific job too.

Before I started the Ringworld series I read A Game of Thrones. I'm not sure if I'm going to read the Dune series following the Stargate series or if I'll go back to A Song of Ice and Fire. If I go for Dune first, Ice and Fire will be after that.
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